Hello,

I want to take a hard look at the core message being delivered by one of our main competitors: Sapien network.  

Their slogan, front and centre on their website, reads as follows:

"Take back your Social Experience

Sapien is a Web 3.0 social news platform that gives users control of their data, rewards content creators, and fights fake news."

BOOM.

Ours?

"Welcome to the world's journal. 

A content community that rewards creators, moderators and all who add value."

 
CRITERION 1 : take away points
Sapien gives multiple, strong takeaway points in one gulp.
A) "Take back your Social Experience" is a call to action that immediately infers there is something to gain/retrieve from switching to Sapien.
In comparison, "Welcome to the world's journal" gives us a word most people - nowadays - don't associate with excitement let alone action.  If someone offers you to read a 'journal', what springs to mind is not immediately exciting.  
 
B) Rather than journal, Sapien's "Web 3.0 social news platform" gives a modern, precise notion of what the platform aims for.  "Journal" as well as being a little boring, actually obscures just how exciting Narrative's proposal actually is - it is much more than a journal, and could be described in just as precise, modern terms as Sapien is doing.
Personally, I'm not a fan of "Web 3.0": "Next level", "Quantum leap in social networking" or something to that effect would probably be more effective.
But in a direct comparison, Sapien is hitting us with more precise and engaging information in that opening volley.
 
C) "control of their data" 
A huge talking point for the proposal of decentralised social networks.  One we've discussed already as something we need to include in our messaging in this thread.
Sapien is exploiting it front and centre - we're not really exploiting it anywhere easily digestible at all, from what I have seen.
 
D) "rewards content creators"
In three words, they get across the essential drift of our entire tagline.
This is the one takeaway point we have in common with them.  The problem is, it is almost our only takeaway point - whereas Sapien has three.
 
E) "fights fake news"
Huge win for Sapien here.  We are aware that moderation by the community can increase the quality of content, and although I don't recall it being openly discussed, it was certainly in the back of my mind that this would be at least somewhat effective at weeding out fake news.
Facebook actively promotes fake news, because anyone can promote any post they want by paying to do so.  With decentralised social networks like ours, reputation, moderation, and community feedback via upvotes and comments can be an opposing force against "fake news".
"fights fake news" rolls off the tongue, and in three words promises to improve perhaps the greatest threat to democracy of our times.
Again, in this thread, we've already touched upon the Netizen appeal of Narrative, and it sounds like the team heard me on the need to use this in our communications.  Sapien has already done so masterfully.
 
The tally?  Three powerful takeaway points, versus our somewhat diluted one.
 
CRITERION 2 : active language, vs passive language
Sapien's wording is active, all the way.  Our's is much more passive.
 
a)
Narrative: The word 'journal' is a relatively passive word.
Sapien: 'Take back your Social Experience' is a battle cry, a call to action, a phrase that rouses sentiments of having had something wrongfully denied us, that we're going to get to lay claim to again.  It is activating and promises the emotional satisfaction of taking back what is ours.
 
b)
Narrative: "A content community".  The particle "a" makes us one of several, when using "the" could distinguish us as unique.  A content community has static connotations: the word community can evoke a group of people standing together affably, sharing a sense of connection.  Positive connotation, but not as active as:
Sapien: "Web 3.0 social news platform".  The word "news" hits us with the notion of something often refreshed, active.  The word "platform" infers a stage, where by definition, the action takes place.
 
c)
Sapien: "gives users control of their data" is active, evokes the notion of receiving something from the platform.  Join and you shall receive.
Narrative: no equivalent (we don't include that talking point)
 
d)
Sapien: "rewards content creators"
Narrative: "rewards creators, moderators and all who add value"
Almost a tie here.  Active promise of reward.  Sapien pulls ahead though, because of the leanness of their three words - the action is not diluted by extra detail.  Yes, Narrative provides more information, but it isn't core information that needs to be in a tagline.  
 
e) 
Sapien: "fights fake news".  Active, active, active.  Fights.  Fights what?  Fake news: an easily identifiable evil that has been on everybody's lips since 2016.
Narrative: no equivalent (we don't include that talking point)
 
 
Conclusion
I think it is clear we need to up our game.
From what I can tell, we have a better product under development, if we can define the optimal way for niches to be operated (discussed in part here and here). 
But as we all know, the better product does not always grab the most market share (would that it were so simple).
 
How we communicate is at least 50% of our growth story.  
Original Post

As a follow up, bonus consideration - Sapien has, right beneath it's tagline, a very effective boast of current activity that gives the immediate sense of an already active product.

The following is elegantly and compactly laid out on a single line on their page

7860
POSTS CREATED
 
10855
COMMENTS MADE
 
2769
ACTIVE USERS
 
1070
ACTIVE BRANCHES
 
152
ACTIVE GROUPS
 
2324918
STAKED SPN
 
------------------------------------
We can't directly compete with this because we are in a limited functionality Alpha, and they are in Beta.
 
But we have some statistics of our own that we could be using just as prominently, but are not.
Why not show how many active content niches to date?
Why not show how many proposed content niches?
Why not show how many users?
 
And last but not least, this is the perfect place to remember the idea of porting this community forum content to the platform, potentially under a special niche that could be called "Narrative Genesis", or "Early Narrative", or "In the beginning..." ...
 
Besides the benefit of launching with a lot of good content already on the platform, it would allow us to show some proof of existing content generation.  Whether we do that now, or at Beta launch, it sends a message to the world that this ball has actually been rolling for a while, has collected a lot of quality contributions from its community, and has matured as a community as a result.  If we don't do this, we pointlessly waste this valuable resource the community has co-created with the team, and we fall further behind in the communications struggle with out competitors.
 

I hadn't heard about Sapien, but this is quite the detailed and enlightening read! I pretty much agree with your analysis of taglines.

As for my 2 cents, I believe the whole line "The Content Economy" gives the impression that Narrative is aimed towards investors hoping to gain money in some way or another. I think Narrative should be marketed foremost as a democratic content platform that spreads it's revenue among it's contributors and in that regard, the term "Economy" may easily imply the thought of hassle or complication among the general public.

In conjunction with that, I also believe Niche ownership should have more meaning than a mere "investment". If I were actively involved in a community (niche), I'd at least like to know who's gaining a share of value behind our backs and be assured that this person is at least a teeny bit interested and/or involved in the niche's topic, and not just an "evil investor earning money in it's sleep" or something among those lines.

These are just some thoughts, I'm no social expert and not that good at wording these things. 

Slaz posted:

I hadn't heard about Sapien, but this is quite the detailed and enlightening read! I pretty much agree with your analysis of taglines.

As for my 2 cents, I believe the whole line "The Content Economy" gives the impression that Narrative is aimed towards investors hoping to gain money in some way or another. I think Narrative should be marketed foremost as a democratic content platform that spreads it's revenue among it's contributors and in that regard, the term "Economy" may easily imply the thought of hassle or complication among the general public.

In conjunction with that, I also believe Niche ownership should have more meaning than a mere "investment". If I were actively involved in a community (niche), I'd at least like to know who's gaining a share of value behind our backs and be assured that this person is at least a teeny bit interested and/or involved in the niche's topic, and not just an "evil investor earning money in it's sleep" or something among those lines.

These are just some thoughts, I'm no social expert and not that good at wording these things. 

I agree @Slaz - the Content Economy is an attractive phrase in certain contexts.  But not for mass appeal.  It is too abstract, and doesn't make the content creator feel like it is immediately relevant to them.

To us who understand the concept already, we get it that it means content creators will be part of an economy that they will benefit from.  But for a newcomer, that phrase does not convey all that meaning at all.  Instead, as you point out, it sounds like it is something for investors, and somewhat removed from the good old social networking and news networking we are all familiar with.

All of this said, and messaging aside - from a aesthetic perspective, we're smoking Sapien.  Their home page is not polished.  Despite a slightly retro feel that may not appeal to everyone, the Narrative homepage has a distinctive style and speaks of attention to detail.  

Malkazoid posted:

All of this said, and messaging aside - from a aesthetic perspective, we're smoking Sapien.  Their home page is not polished.  Despite a slightly retro feel that may not appeal to everyone, the Narrative homepage has a distinctive style and speaks of attention to detail.  

Agreed. While a bit abstract looking, Narrative's homepage layout feels unique and is easily distinguishable. For example, just looking at Narrative's newsletter header without reading the title and context of the email, will easily tell you it's from Narrative.

Sapien's homepage on the other hand just looks like a dozen other crypto-related sites that try to be modern. They're even including those swirling vector thingamajigs on a dark blue-ish background in their header. It just screams "Look we are decentralized and modern!!". Of course their aesthetics might change over time, but I believe that Narrative is currently upfront here.

Just imagine Facebook changing it's signature color or the f-logo. It would confuse people as well as throw away part of the established recognition with the brand. Aesthetic guidelines are an important factor that should be set in stone before the launch of any website/platform.

Add Reply

Post
×
×
×
×